60th & 50th Booklets

This is a copy of the text in our 2008:

 

60th Anniversary

Commemorative Booklet

Most of the history of the Club was originally recorded in the 50th Anniversary Booklets published in 1998.  That original booklet forms the larger part of this publication.  This preface adds a little to the history of events in recent years and Ross Martin has researched the awards made during the last ten years and these have been added to the original tabulations of the 50th anniversary booklet.  Past-President Mark Logan has again attended to its publication.

During the closing years of the 20th Century the Club mourned the loss of two of its stalwarts of many years.  June Travail is remembered in the June Travail Trophy awarded since 2003 for the winning Portfolio of Slide Images competed for annually by all experienced members.

Ernie Cooke‘s name was given to the Club’s Photographer of the Year trophy in 2003.  In this case the highest cumulative scores for prints and/or slides over the preceding winter identifies the ten members invited to submit six images, taken during the summer break, for the title of PoTY.

The Inter-Club competition for the Highland Challenge Shield became established in I 999.  Clubs from around the Highlands and Islands are eligible to submit ten images from no fewer than five authors.  No competition is more keenly contested, and Inverness was the winning Club in 1999, 2005 and 2007.

No greater change in the activities of photography clubs across the UK has taken place than that arising from the arrival of digital technology.  The last years of the 20th century saw the introduction of the first digital SLR and within the space of about five years professional photographers had switched almost entirely from film to digital SLR cameras.

Perhaps an even bigger impact on the life of camera clubs was the appearance of compact digital cameras and the availability of processing facilities along the High Street of every city in the land.

As the technology improved and prices fell a good quality digital camera came within reach of folks of even modest means and given their incorporation into the parallel fast-evolution of the mobile telephone the capture of digital images has become an everyday occurrence.

Camera Clubs, as the location of members’ darkrooms, found their use in rapid decline.  Inverness Camera Club membership had fallen to less than thirty by the end of 1999 and the premises had declined also.

By 2006 the Club had decided that it had to sell the property on Stephen ‘s Brae as the legal obligations of its ownership had radically altered since it had established a Trusteeship at the time of the original purchase.

The fabric of the building required major expenditure which the Club could not afford and by 2007 the premises were sold; the Club Constitution had been rewritten and adopted and the Club had decamped to the Churches House at Culduthel Christian Centre.

Accompanying these changes, the digital revolution saw an upsurge in the Club’s membership.  It stands at sixty-eight members for the season ending April 2009.  One or two early members remain, and the age profile of the club has widened from the 20s to the 70s, with a growing proportion of lady members.

With the introduction of the digital darkroom aka the computer the demand for skills training quickly emerged and the Club invested in a suite of four laptop computers and a digital computer/projector.  This equipment has allowed the development of direct teaching of both the new technological skills and the traditional photographic camera skills to the point that the Club meets on Mondays for workshops and on Wednesdays for the established Camera Club programme of Speakers and Competitions.

In the competitive field Inverness Camera Club has begun to become better known in Scotland, the UK and Internationally.  In the latter category a handful of members submit images which not only gain acceptances into exhibition catalogues but win the highest awards.  Such experts encourage and assist newer and less experienced members to submit work for external competition and a growing number are achieving success and recognition for the Club.

As the Club celebrates this 60th anniversary the World is experiencing economic troubles and recession has taken hold.  No doubt these economic troubles will pass, as have all such that have gone before, but in the meantime the Club will have to manage its resources prudently if it is to sustain its present buoyant level of activity at Culduthel.

As we anticipate the 60th birthday celebration, the summer break and the season which begins our next decade Inverness Camera Club opens its digital window on to the world at http://invernesscameraclub.co.uk/

There, existing members can shape the view the world will have of us and prospective members can see for themselves just why it is such a thriving and friendly organisation.  The then Club President, Hugh Nicol, wrote in 1998 ” …  I do believe that both photography as an art and Inverness Camera Club as one of its proponents will continue to flourish over the next 50 years”.

Certainly, his prophecy has proved correct for the first ten; I have no doubt it will
continue to be so for the next forty.

Derek B McGinn
President.

 


This is a copy of the text in our 1998:

 

50th Anniversary

Commemorative Booklet

 

Origins of The Club – 1

The Background to Its Formation

The name of D Whyte’s Studio is well known to the present generation of Invernessians, mainly thanks to the magnificent collection of negatives of Inverness and its citizens in the late 1800’s and early 1900’s.  The negatives from the Studio are held as an archive by Highland Council and known as the Whyte Collection.  Prints from these negatives and plates are published regularly in the Inverness Courier.

Not so well known, however is the connection of D Whyte’s Studio with the formation of Inverness Camera Club.  Mr Whyte, founder of the business, died around 1904.  After the First World War, D Whyte’s Studio was taken over by Mr G.M. Tyrrell, who had served as a naval photographer during the war.  In August 1946 Mr Tyrrell assumed as an apprentice on a four-year apprenticeship, Mr Fred Hardley who had just been ‘demobbed’ after six years army service.  Fred, who already was an accomplished photographer was soon entrusted with running the business for Mr Tyrrell, and on the completion of his apprenticeship in 1950, bought the business and ran it successfully until his retirement in 1985.

In 1948 Fred Hardley started an evening class in Photography in Inverness Royal Academy (now the Midmills Buildings of Inverness College).  He entitled the class ‘Art Photography’, his mission being to educate the snappers of Inverness to produce artistic photographs.  The County Council Education Committee would however have none of it!  Art and Photography were two entirely different things and totally unrelated!  The class must be entitled ‘Photography’ and nothing else.  Notwithstanding this, the class proved very popular and well supported.

So, why a camera club? The idea of forming a club had been informally discussed in the class for some time, but its actual foundation was precipitated in a rather bizarre way.  As the skills of his pupils developed, Mr Hardley approached the Director of Academy evening classes to enquire whether accommodation could be made available for a darkroom.  After considerable thought, the Director proclaimed that he had the ideal solution.  The Photography Class would be provided with a wooden board to enable it to convert the Rector’s private WC into a darkroom on the evenings of the Class! The accommodation measured approximately three feet by two and might just admit two people at a squash.  The formation of Inverness Camera Club became inevitable and urgent, the official date of formation being 25 November 1948!

We are indebted to Mr Hardley for providing the information on which the above is based.


Origins of The Club – 2

Extracted from an Article Contributed by
The Late J. Ames Campbell, JP.

Founder president to the first issue of the club magazine, ZOOM in 1966

The original idea of forming a Camera Club in Inverness was discussed at evening classes for Photography held in the Royal Academy by Mr Hardley, now the popular owner of D Whyte’s Studios, Church Street, Inverness.  A Committee was formed, officials appointed, and the Inverness Camera Club was inaugurated in the autumn of 1948.  Club rooms were obtained, fitted with the necessary equipment and they were ready for occupation in December of that year.

Several well-known gentlemen were approached with the view to acting as Hon. Vice-Presidents and after considerable correspondence the following agreed:-

The Earl Cawdor

Major Chas. Ian Fraser of Reelig
Lieut.  Col. Frank W.  Sopper, O.B.E.
Provost R. Wotherspoon

The official opening of the Club took place on the 20th of January 1949, in the Club Rooms at Fourth Street, Dempster Gardens.  A letter of apology was read from Earl Cawdor who was unexpectedly called to London.  Provost Wotherspoon deputised for him and declared the Club Rooms open.  Several spoke, including Major Chas. Ian Fraser, who gave a talk on ‘Photography as a hobby’.  There was a large attendance and several new members enrolled, bringing the total to about 85.  Two Challenge Cups which have since been keenly competed for annually were presented at the meeting.

The Club prospered and by April, 1950, an Exhibition open to Great Britain was held in the Queensgate Hotel.  This was highly successful, 599 prints being submitted, many from the leading amateur and professional photographers in the country.  Of the 181 prints accepted in the Open Section, no less than 23 were from Members of the Inverness Camera Club – no small achievement from a Club only one and a half years old.  Better results still were attained at subsequent Exhibitions, four of which were held – the last in 1954.  During this period the Membership increased and was for a time well over 100 but shortly after this some of the older Members passed on and a few left the area.  Unfortunately, those left found it too much of an undertaking to run further Exhibitions.

The Club, however, continued to prosper although the interest in monochrome somewhat waned.  I am glad to see, nevertheless, some excellent work produced in black and white, and I think this interest, which I now understand has recently revived, should be encouraged.

The Club owes a tremendous debt of gratitude to the founder Members that went to no end of trouble to make the Club a success, especially to those who, not for one year only but for several years, undertook the onerous duties of President, Secretary, Treasurer, etc.  I refrain from mentioning any of them by name as any omission would be a pity, but I have in my possession a complete list of Members at the time of the inauguration of the Club and shall be pleased to hand this to the Secretary, if desired.

I wish the Club as a whole continued prosperity.

Jas.  Campbell,
Founder President

 


 

The First Half Century

Home from Home!

Founder President James Campbell arranged for the newly formed Inverness Camera Club to occupy premises at Fourth Street, Dempster Gardens, and the clubrooms were officially opened on 20th January 1949, complete with darkroom which had been fully equipped for the sum of £6. 19s. 6d.  (£6.98p)!  The property was leased from British Rail, and Mr Campbell very generously personally paid the rent in the early years.  The lease ended in 1957 but the club was able to occupy the premises on a short-term basis until 1962.

In 1962 the club moved to a new home at 121 Church Street.  The entry to the Dempster Gardens clubroom had been a little short of perfect, but the approach to the new home was reminiscent of the Hammer House of Horrors!  Members had to climb ill-lit stairs through a maze of (empty) coffins stored there by a firm of funeral furnishing wholesalers.  Add to this the reputation of the lecture hall having been the site of the last duel fought in Inverness, and it is hardly surprising that the committee was soon on the lookout for alternative accommodation.

By 1971 the club moved into the old billiard room of the Highland Club in High Street but sadly in view particularly of the power of work put into the conversion by club members, the lease was terminated in 1974.  There followed years of frustration, a derelict house in Innes Street serving as a darkroom, with meetings in the Clansman Hotel and Spectrum Centre.

In 1978, the club was offered the opportunity to purchase the disused Mission Hall on Stephens Brae.  There followed a flurry of meetings with lawyers, Highland and Islands Development Board, Highland Regional Council, (as a result of which both bodies gave the club valuable and generous financial assistance), seeking guarantees from members, serious fund-raising efforts, a mass of repair and conversion work by members, and at last by spring 1979 the club was in occupation of its own premises.  These premises, consisting of darkroom, lecture hall/studio, kitchen and toilet have served us well to the present day, but the building is old and presents us with problems.

 

Education

The Club, as we have seen originated in a photography class, and the ethic of more experienced members helping the less experienced in both technical skills and aesthetic approach has always been fundamental to the club’s philosophy.  This has been achieved by a combination of formal structured beginners’ classes each year covering all the basics of photography; demonstrations of more advanced techniques; print and slide criticism evenings, and in recent years through workshops organised with the Royal Photographic Society.  The club annually organises day outings to places deemed to have photographic possibilities.  Although these always provide enjoyable social events, more often than not the weather has resulted in a minimum of film being used!

 

Tarradale

In 1976, the club’s innovative and enthusiastic member Derek Matheson promoted with the assistance of the Extra-mural Studies department of Aberdeen University, an ambitious project which ran through annually to 1984.  The idea was that members from a wide range of photographic clubs from Dundee northward should meet once a year for a weekend workshop and practical seminar at the University’s field study centre, Tarradale House on the Black Isle.  Thanks to Derek’s many contacts and his powers of persuasion, these weekends were a resounding success.  Eventually, however, the events proved a victim of their own success.  Considering the widespread number of clubs and individuals who benefited, the Inverness club felt that it could not be the sole underwriter of the not inconsiderable costs involved, and the last Tarradale weekend was in 1984.  It is encouraging that the concept of residential photographic weekends has recently revived, with visits to the National Trust for Scotland’s centre at Morvich.

 

Exhibitions

The club has throughout its existence endeavoured to show to the public both its own members’ work and the best of club photography.  An Open Exhibition was held in 1950.  This attracted nearly 600 entries, of which 239 were hung.  Approximately 2000 visitors viewed the exhibition.

For a number of years, the club held annual exhibitions of members’ work, with an Open Exhibition in 1955.  In 1967 a monochrome exhibition was held in the Art Gallery, opened by Mr Russell Johnstone, MP.

The following year, and again in 1971 the club hosted the Photographic Alliance of Great Britain Annual Exhibition, viewed in 1971 by 7300 visitors.  In 1974 under the inspired leadership of John Harvey, the club organised and presented The Scottish Salon of Photography Exhibition.  This was a mammoth effort, attracting some 8000 visitors.

The swing away from black and white prints and into transparencies in the later 1970’s and the 1980’s meant that there was no longer a pool of members new work from which exhibitions could be arranged, and more modest displays became the rule.

Happily the club is again in a position where member’s prints both in monochrome and colour are available to provide an exhibition of which the club can be proud.

 

Communications and Recruitment

The exhibitions staged by the club over the years, together with press reports and advertising have been the clubs main way of communicating with the public.  Despite the large numbers of people attending the exhibitions, the club’s membership has only rarely reached 100, and is more normally about half that number.  This too despite the optimism and enterprise of a press secretary in the early days of the club, who included at the end of an advertisement of a forthcoming club event, ‘American Papers Please Copy’.

Zoom

Communication with members is usually on an ad hoc basis, but from 1966, first on its own and subsequently with the Moray and Dingwall clubs, the Inverness club published a quarterly magazine ‘ZOOM‘ for members.  Whilst it ran, this proved a popular and useful means of communication, and provided a basis for the interchange of knowledge by means of articles, both technical and light-hearted.  Demands on the editor, however, were such as to require a great deal of enthusiasm, and this coupled with rising costs of production and distribution, caused publication to cease in 1975.

 

Visiting Lecturers

Visits by lecturers form a major part of the life of any camera club.  They may talk on technical or aesthetic matters or deliver a slide show of more or less complicated presentation on their selected topic.  The exposure of the public to increasingly superb images, particularly of travel and natural history, on the television screen, and the consequent sophistication of demand by the viewer has led in particular to improved standards of technique both in taking and presentation.  The Inverness club has over the years been privileged to welcome as lecturers many excellent and talented photographers.  They still come, despite the vote of thanks delivered many years ago by the then president, who shall be nameless, to an august Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society, “…thank you for coming up to show us your snaps…”.

 

Competitions and Judges

Club and inter-club competitions also form a major part of the life blood of a camera club and Inverness has always used competitions to stimulate interest and improvement in members, both on a monthly or annual basis.

Inter-club competitions, often light-hearted, frequently form part of a combined social and serious get-together, but there is always something to be learned on such occasions.  Judges must be independent, and the Inverness club has been fortunate in being able to call on a variety of willing and knowledgeable judges, most of whom have been sensitive in particular to the feelings of beginners.  And one can be certain that in every competition, there is at least one competitor who agrees with the judge!

The club is the proud possessor of a considerable number of cups and trophies which are awarded annually.  The increase in trophies over the years to some extent mirrors the development of photography over the club’s lifetime.

Firstly, we had the Campbell Cup, and the Nairn Cup, both presented for monochrome Competition.  As time went by, interest in colour transparencies grew as the ASA rating of Kodachrome began to exceed 10, and in 1956 Mrs G M Tyrrell presented a cup for competition in this medium.  As time went by further cups and trophies were added.

It is interesting to recall that the prize for intermediate Black and White work was a magazine subscription, until 1963.  When the competition was won by founder member George Bruce, with a portrait of the then president, Dick Fleming, Dick considered that in the circumstances it was only fitting that he should present a proper trophy, and so the Fleming Cup was added to the club’s silverware.

The latest addition to the Club’s trophies is the Roger MacLeod Quaich, which was presented to the Club in 1996.

 

Moving Image

In the early years of the club, a few members were keen ‘cine’ as well as still photographers, although most felt that still photography was the serious form.

A notable exception was John Edgar, who excelled in both mediums, and hopefully some of his cine films taken in the 1940’s and 50’s will soon become available copied on to video.  But otherwise until recently the mainstream members of the club have tended to regard movies as a separate interest.  Happily, the advent of readily available video cameras and materials at affordable prices has given motion pictures a well-deserved boost in popularity, and hopefully the club video section will become less isolated from the ‘stills’.

 

Competitive Spirit

The atmosphere of the Inverness Camera Club throughout its first fifty years has been friendly and relaxed.  The club has not been driven by a fiercely competitive spirit, either within the club or in contest with other clubs, and there is no pressure on individual members to enter club competitions.

Individual members have however achieved considerable success over the years with acceptances in major exhibitions including the Royal Photographic Society, the Photographic Alliance of Great Britain, The Scottish Salon, to name but a few.

The club has in recent years basked in the glory of Steve Austin’s successes in the Wildlife Photographer of the Year Competition and can look forward to future successes by Junior member Calum Brown to follow his outstanding achievements in a Young Photographer ‘Focus Environment’ competition sponsored by Texaco, S.N.H. and S.C.P. in 1995, 1996, 1997 and 1998.

Gordon Gillespie is another former member who has achieved national success by winning the Scottish Sports Photographer of the Year in 1993 and 1999.

 

The Autumn Outing By

Under D. Veloped.

The day dawned overcast and dull, although not cold.  As I made my way down to the meeting place, I mused on how frequently the Camera Club outings were bedevilled by indifferent weather, and today would surely be no exception.  Still I thought I must make this a real photographic occasion, particularly as a competition was involved.  The mood of slight depression lifted, as I noted the good turnout in Queensgate, and one felt the day was going to be a success after all.

It was then that I noticed him.  He was a new member.  I had seen him once or twice at the club, and had vaguely labelled him as someone new to photography, who had just discovered that if one puts colour film into a camera and exposes, one gets coloured results; I did not know his name and, being a new member, apart from a welcome from the President, naturally no one had spoken to him!

We moved off, and I suddenly found I was sitting next to the new member.

It was then that I realised he carried no camera, and the awful thought struck me that he might ask for a ‘shot’ of mine.  I shuddered as I pictured his inept fingers touching my new 35MMSLRTTLMETERAUTODIAPHRAGM model, with its five lenses and various other accessories I had brought with me in a fitted suitcase; I reflexly put my hand down to guard this valuable equipment.

“Not a very nice day for an outing” I opened.  “No” he countered, and then (glancing at the case) he said “staying away for the night then?”  I looked at him pityingly and explained the photographic facts of life to him.  He was acutely embarrassed but recovered as I condescendingly showed him my equipment and expanded on the mysteries of the S.L.R.  and the T.T.L.  etc; he listened intently, keen to learn, and obviously almost pathetically grateful for the photography lesson I was giving him.  I positively began to like the new member.  I decided I would stay with him throughout the afternoon, if only to inculcate into him more photographic theory.

After lunch we climbed a small knoll overlooking the river giving a fine panorama of the hills in the background.  To my amazement he put his hand in his hip pocket and took out what at first, I thought to be a flask, but then realised it was a folding camera of considerable age.  “Got it in the early thirties” he explained; a German Shutterbug – a great camera in its day.  I looked at it.  “An f8 lens” he continued proudly – “of course I rarely use it at full aperture”.  I noticed that the lens showed some scratches.  Reading my thoughts he explained that he liked a few blemishes on his lens, as it caused pleasant diffusion in the final print, and he further opined that modern lenses were too sharp and contrasty.  “Film” I queried, “The old Verichrome was the finest film” he said, “but unfortunately one must use panchromatic material now.  But” he added cheerily “I always use a deep green filter – the blue element removes the red sensitivity and the yellow element then acts as an ordinary yellow filter’.

“Of course, for modern photography one requires at least one long focus lens”, I preached.  He seemed to wish to agree with me, but said he found no difficulty in enlarging a small portion of his negative to quite a size.  “Oh”, I said, “you process your film then?”  “Oh yes”, he said.

“Pyrosoda” you know.  “Pyro-soda” I articulated, “but grain” I almost screamed.  “Oh.  Yes grain” he repeated, rather helplessly I thought, I read about it once in a book . At this moment the sun broke through the clouds, revealing a beautiful landscape of great photographic potential.  I hurriedly opened my suitcase and removed the camera.
A glance through the pentaprism told me that I would have to use the 135 mm lens.  Carefully I removed the 50 mm lens and placed it in its dust case, removed the 135 mm lens from its case, and screwed it into the camera.  This seemed better, but the aperture which the T.T.L.  meter indicated, appeared very small, and I realised that as this was an against the light shot I would have to increase the indicated exposure.  Turning the lever from auto to manual I opened two stops.  All this took time.  Unfortunately, at this moment the clouds closed in again, and the photograph was lost for ever, I sadly began to put my camera back in its case.

I noticed the new member was also replacing his camera in his pocket.

“C ‘est la guerre” I quipped, “my native wit asserting itself.”
“C ‘est la guerre” he repeated, and for the first time I saw the flicker of a smile cross his face.

I did not see the new member again until three weeks later when the photos taken at the outing were being judged for the president’s prize of a firkin of ale.  There were several undistinguished shots; but the members were clustered round a 20 by 16 print of superb technique and tonal graduation such as the club had not seen for many years.  I admired it jealously.  Then it dawned on me – must have been taken from the knoll we were standing on.  I hadn’t taken a photograph, and no one else had been there except of course the new member, and surely, he couldn’t have—

000 —

The foregoing article appeared in issue 14 of the Club Magazine, ZOOM, dated March 1969.

 

50 Years On, and Where to Now?

This anniversary marks a significant point in the Club’s history and being President at this time is both a privilege and an honour.  However, with these comes responsibility, not only to take stock at this time and reflect on the past successes of the Club and its Members, but also to continue the efficient stewardship of the Club’s affairs which has been carried out over the years by numerous Presidents and Office-Bearers.

There is also a duty to plan for the future, and to this end the Committee have already detailed plans to upgrade and modernise the Club premises in Stephen’s Brae. The success of this will depend on many factors coming together, but this is a major challenge which the present Committee intend to see through to completion if at all possible.

Photography has advanced much in the past 50 years and to some the rate of change seems to be progressing at an ever-increasing pace. The latest digital equipment and technology is opening up a whole new field and introducing newcomers to the possibilities in the art of the photographic imager and although some see this as possibly sounding the death-knell of some traditional aspects of photography I feel that in the future all areas can co-exist and prosper together.

Without a crystal ball I hesitate to predict the future, but I do believe that both photography as an art and Inverness Camera Club as one of its proponents will continue to flourish over the next 50 years.

Hugh A. Nicol
President.

 


As at 2008

 

 

Current Honorary Life Members

R. Martin ARPS.

Ian Rhind

 

Deceased Former Honorary Members & Officers

Honorary Vice-Presidents (Deceased)

The Earl Cawdor

Major C I Fraser of Reelig

Lt. Col F W Sopper, OBE

Provost R Wotherspcon

James Campbell Esq. JP

Alex Robertson, Esq. MA. ARPS.

James Campbell, Esq. JP

R S Morrison, Esq. Phc, FBOA

James Nairn, Esq.

Donald McLeman, Esq.

George Farquharson, Esq.

F. M Hardley Esq.

G. M. F. Bruce Esq.

J. Joyce Esq. FRPS.

E. J. Cooke Esq. FRPS

 


As at 2008

Founded
25th November 1948

Presidents

1948

– 1949

James Campbell

1978

– 1979

D C Mackenzie

1949

–  1950

James Campbell

1979

–  1980

R McClune

1950

–  1951

A Robertson ARPS

1980

–  1981

R McClune

1951

–  1952

H M MacDonald

1981

–  1982

Vacant

1952

–  1953

R Gordon Wilson FRPS

1982

–  1983

I C Rhind

1953

–  1954

R Gordon Wilson FRPS

1983

–  1984

I C Rhind

1954

–  1955

G Farquharson

1984

–  1985

I C Rhind

1955

–  1956

A Robertson ARPS

1985

–  1986

J I R Martin LRPS

1956

–  1957

A Robertson ARPS

1986

–  1987

I C Rhind

1957

–  1958

A Robertson ARPS

1987

–  1988

J C Jones LRPS

1958

–  1959

A Robertson ARPS

1988

–  1989

S Sloan

1959

–  1960

G Farquharson

1989

–  1990

G Gunn

1960

–  1961

W H Cooper

1990

–  1991

S Brown

1961

–  1962

A R McLeod

1991

–  1992

S Brown

1962

–  1963

J W R Richardson

1992

–  1993

J C Jones LRPS

1963

–  1964

Major D Fleming

1993

–  1994

S Brown

1964

–  1965

Dr A R MacKinnon

1994

–  1995

I Fairgrieve

1965

–  1966

J I R Martin

1995

–  1996

I Fairgrieve LRPS

1966

–  1967

D McLeman

1996

–  1997

I Fairgrieve LRPS

1967

–  1968

D McLeman

1997

–  1998

H A Nicol

1968

–  1969

Major D Fleming

1998

–  1999

H A Nicol

1969

–  1970

Major D Fleming

1999

–  2000

H A Nicol

1970

–  1971

J A F Bain

2000

–  2001

Stef Brown

1971

–  1972

G Proctor

2001

–  2002

Stef Brown

1972

–  1973

G Proctor

2002

–  2003

Stef Brown

1973

–  1974

A H Hamilton ARPS

2003

–  2004

Margaret Reid

1974

–  1975

J C Harvey

2004

–  2005

Margaret Reid

1975

–  1976

J I R Martin

2005

–  2006

Margaret Reid

1976

–  1977

Vacant

2006

–  2007

Mark Logan

1977

–  1978

D C Mackenzie

2007

–  2008

Mark Logan LPPS

2008

–  2009

Derek McGinn

 


As at 2008

The Highland Challenge Shield (1999)
Inter-club Competition

 

Host Club

Winner

1999

Dingwall

Inverness

2000

Inverness

Dingwall

2001

Cromarty

Dingwall

2001

Thurso

Dingwall

2002

Nairn

Dingwall

2003

East Sutherland

Cromarty

2004

Inverness

Dingwall

2005

Dingwall

Inverness

2006

Thurso

Cromarty

2007

Nairn

Inverness

2008

Cromarty

Dingwall

 

2001 there was a change of format for this competition resulting in two events being held.

 


The J Campbell Cup (1950)
Prints Monochrome or Colour (Beginners)

 

1950

I MacLeod

1980

No Award

1951

LW Payne

1981

No Award

1952

Anne Shirra

1982

No Award

1953

Mrs M Shirra

1983

No Award

1954

A J Fraser

1984

P Bolt

1955

Mrs Jean E Milne

1985

S Sloan

1956

D Edwards

1986

No Award

1957

J R Allan

1987

No Award

1958

W J MacLean

1988

G J Gunn

1959

Mrs D Will

1989

Mrs J Martin

1960

J Sheret

1990

V Giles

1961

H D McBeath

1991

Irene MacLeod

1962

G M F Bruce

1992

Dorothy Carse

1963

H H Graham

1993

Hugh Nicol

1964

J A F Bain

1994

Lesley Simpson

1965

J Harvey

1995

Calum Brown

1966

P J Conduit

1996

No Award

1967

J L Brown

1997

Amanda Mclnnes

1968

T Davies

1998

Tom McWilliam

1969

D I Kewley

1999

David Nash

1970

No Award

2000

Doris Burns

1971

H G Grieve

2001

John Ross

1972

No Award

2002

Ann Hodgson

1973

No Award

2003

Ricky Fraser

1974

J P Sutherland

2004

Martin Searle

1975

M F Menzies

2005

Roddy Reid

1976

B Donald

2006

Octawain Domagala

1977

No Award

2007

Dave Johnson

1978

No Award

2008

Catherine Clark

1979

S K Sim

 


Highland Shield (1972)
Colour Transparencies (Beginners)

 

1972

D Matheson

1991

I MacLeod/D Gourley

1973

J C Harvey

1992

Dorothy Carse

1974

J P Sutherland

1993

Phyllis Grant

1975

R A McClune

1994

Ross Trevail

1976

A W Harper

1995

John Simpson

1977

M Brunton

1996

Rosemary Simpson

1978

S Thomas

1997

Duncan McInnes

1979

W Campbell

1998

Annie MacDonald

1980

PR Fletcher

1999

No Award

1981

Angela Donald

2000

No Award

1982

J MacDonald

2001

Harry Payne

    1983

No Award

2002

Derek McGinn

    1984

M Iredale

2003

Ricky Fraser

    1985

W S Murray

2004

No Award

1986

Joan Martin

2005

No Award

1987

M C Barker

2006

No Award

1988

Stef Brown

2007

Helen Stanley

1989

R W Cliff

2008

No Award

1990

Vince Giles

 


 

Major Dick Fleming Cup (1963)
Monochrome Prints (Intermediate)

Prior to 1963, the winner of the competition was awarded a magazine subscription.

1956

G S Grant

1970

D MacLeman

1957

No Award

1971

D I Kewley

1958

A R MacKinnon

1972

C Proctor

1959

A R McLeod

1973

No Award

1960

J Richardson

1974

No Award

1961

J R Allan

1975

J L Brown

1962

No Award

1976

Miss S MacKintosh

1963

George Bruce

1977

M Brunton

1964

H H Graham

1978

B Donald

1965

J A F Bain

1979

J P Sutherland

1966

J C Harvey

1980

No Award

1967

P J Conduit

1981

No Award

1968

J I R Martin

1982

No Award

1969

T Davies

From 1984 this cup has been awarded for a print, monochrome or colour, on a set subject.

1983

No Award

1996

J Trevail

1984

J P Sutherland

1997

J Trevail

1985

K Roberts

1998

H A Nicol

1986

A C McKay

1999

Ernest J Cooke

1987

P J Boyce

2000

Leslie Simpson

1988

No Award

2001

Mark Logan

1989

S Brown

2002

Stef Brown

1990

Mrs D Gill

2003

Ken McInnes

1991

C Jones

2004

Gordon Harvey

1992

S Austin

2005

John Ross

1993

2006

Ricky Fraser

1994

I Fairgrieve

2007

Ricky Fraser

1995

H A Nicol

2008

Jim Sutherland

 


The Nairn Challenge Cup (1952)
Monochrome Prints (Open)

1952

A Robertson

1981

I Rhind

1953

A Robertson

1982

E J Cooke FRPS

1954

R G Wilson

1983

B Donald

1955

RG Wilson

1984

B Donald

1956

R G Wilson

1985

J I R Martin LRPS

1957

A H Hamilton

1986

J I R Martin LRPS

1958

A Robertson

1987

P J Boyce

1959

A R MacKinnon

1988

P J Boyce

1960

A R MacLeod

1989

R W Cliff

1961

Mrs D Will

1990

No Award

1962

Mrs D Will

1991

Mrs M Quick

1963

H D McBeath

1992

W Todd

1964

A R MacKinnon

1993

C Jones

1965

J A F Bain

1994

S Brown

1966

A Robertson

1995

I Fairgrieve

1967

J A F Bain

1996

S Brown

1968

J A F Bain

1997

I Fairgrieve LRPS

1969

A F Robertson

1998

S Brown

1970

J A F Bain

1999

Ernest J Cooke

1971

J A F Bain

2000

Stef Brown

1972

J A F Bain

2001

Ken McInnes

1973

J Joyce ARPS

2002

Ernest J Cooke

1974

J Joyce ARPS

2003

Ken McInnes

1975

J Joyce ARPS

2004

Ken McInnes

1976

J Joyce ARPS

2005

John Ross

1977

D Matheson

2006

John Ross

1978

M Brunton

2007

Alastair Cochrane

1979

J I R Martin LRPS

2008

Mark Logan LRPS

1980

J P Sutherland


The Elena Mae Cup (1981)

For a Portfolio of six Transparencies or Prints
on a Theme chosen by the Entrant

1981

B Donald

1982

C Jones

1983

Angela Donald & Bill Donald

1984

P Brown

1985

K Roberts

1986

P Brown

1987

C Jones

1988

S Sloan

1989

H Nelson

1990

C Jones

1991

A Beattie

1992

Jan Brown

1993

Hugh Nicol

1994

Dorothy Carse

1995

Dorothy Carse

1996

Hugh Nicol

1997

Dorothy Carse

1998

Lesley Simpson

1999

Ernest J Cooke

2000

John Simpson

2001

Rosemary Simpson

2002

Leslie Simpson

2003

Mark Logan

2004

John Ross

2005

John Ross

2006

Derek McGinn

2007

Jim Sutherland

2008

Gary Williamson

 


 

Ness Cup (1978)
Colour Prints (Open)

1978

J L Brown

1979

J L Brown

1980

J I R Martin LRPS

1981

E J Cooke FRPS

1982

E J Cooke FRPS

1983

E J Cooke FRPS

1984

No Award

1985

J Simpson

1986

K Roberts

1987

K Roberts

1988

S Sloan

1989

I Hamilton

1990

R W Cliff

1991

R W Cliff

1992

S Austin

1993

I Fairgrieve

1994

H A Nicol/E J Cooke FRPS

1995

H A Nicol

1996

I Fairgrieve

1997

H A Nicol

1998

H A Nicol

1999

Ernest J Cooke

2000

Ernest J Cooke

2001

E J Cooke & N Winterbottom

2002

Gordon Harvey

2003

Gordon Harvey

2004

John Ross

2005

Mark Logan & John Ross

2006

John Ross

2007

Alastair Cochrane

2008

John Ross


MacDonald Cup (1979)
Transparency – (Set Subject)

 

1979

J P Sutherland

1994

Steve Austin

1980

P R Fletcher

1995

Ken Brown

1981

J MacKenzie

1996

Rosemary Simpson

1982

Jane Neal

1997

Dorothy Carse & Lesley Simpson

1983

J Leetham

1998

June Trevail

1984

A M Fraser

1999

Rosemary Simpson

1985

P Brown

2000

Jan Brown

1986

D R MacPherson

2001

Dorothy Carse

1987

H Nelson

2002

Jan Brown

1988

G Bruce

2003

Tim Johnston

1989

G Bruce

2004

Jan Brown

1990

Jan Brown

2005

Jan Brown

1991

Catherine Gunn

2006

Gordon Harvey

1992

Dorothy Carse

2007

Alastair Cochrane

1993

Jan Brown

2008

Ross Martin


The George Morton Tyrrell Cup (1956)
Colour Transparencies (Open)

1956

J Campbell

1983

R Castro

1957

J Campbell

1984

P Brown

1958

A Robertson

1985

P Brown

1959

D Andrew

1986

M R Logan

1960

DE K Fraser

1987

Angela Donald

1961

A R McLeod

1988

G Bruce & S Sloan

1962

H D McBeath

1989

H Nelson

1963

A R McLeod

1990

Stef Brown

1964

J W R Richardson

1991

Jan Brown

1965

A R McLeod

1992

Jan Brown

1966

J Weir

1993

Jan Brown

1967

J I R Martin

1994

Steve Austin

1968

J I R Martin

1995

Andy Howard

1969

G L Harvey

1996

Dorothy Carse

1970

J A F Bain

1997

Jan Brown

1971

N S Sutherland

1998

L Simpson

1972

G Proctor

1999

Ross Martin

1973

D Matheson

2000

Ian Fairgrieve

1974

J Joyce

2001

Jan Brown

1975

J I R Martin

2002

R Simpson

1976

J I R Martin

2003

Derek McGinn

1977

D Matheson

2004

Derek McGinn

1978

G Hendry

2005

Ricky Fraser

1979

D C MacKenzie

2006

Fergus Smith

1980

J P Sutherland

2007

Ricky Fraser

1981

J P Sutherland

2008

Ross Martin

1982

J P Sutherland

 


The John C Harvey Shield (1978)

Awarded for the most credits from entries in monthly competitions throughout the year

1978

R A McClune

1979

J P Sutherland

1980

D Corsar

1981

I Rhind

1982

B Donald

1983

P Brown

1984

P Brown

1985

P Brown

1986

P Brown

1987

M Stew

1988

R Martin

1989

G J Gunn

1990

Jan Brown

1991

C Jones

1992

Jan Brown

1993

Phyllis Grant

1994

Steve Austin

1995

June Trevail

1996

Lesley Simpson

1997

June Trevail

1998

Lesley Simpson

1999

L Simpson & Rosemary Simpson

2000

Jan Brown

2001

Jan Brown

2002

Jan Brown

2003

Tim Johnston

2004

Jan Brown

2005

Derek McGinn

2006

Jan Brown & Derek McGinn

2007

F Smith, R Fraser & G Harvey

2008

Ross Graham


The Roger McLeod Trophy (1996)

Awarded for the most credits from print entries in monthly competitions throughout the year

1996

Hugh A Nicol

1997

Hugh A Nicol

1998

A. MacDonald & Hugh A Nicol

1999

Stef Brown & Hugh Nicol

2000

Stef Brown

2001

John Ross & Ken McInnes

2002

Ernest J Cooke

2003

Ken McInnes

2004

Ricky Fraser

2005

M Logan, R Miller & J Ross

2006

Robin Miller

2007

Diane Morrison

2008

Gary Williamson


June Trevail Trophy (2003)
Portfolio – Projected Images (Open)

 

2003

Derek McGinn

2004

Derek McGinn

2005

Leslie Simpson

2006

Jan Brown

2007

Gordon Harvey

2008

Alastair Cochrane

 


Stephen Brae Cup
Highest number of Monochrome Print Credits in Year (2008)

 

2008

Mark Logan L.R.P.S. & Gary Williamson


Ernest J Cooke Trophy

Inverness Camera Club

Photographer of the Year

Portfolio of six prints or projected images, three set and three open subjects.
Entry restricted to the top ten point-scoring competitors in the years Monthly
Competitions.

2003

John Ross

2004

John Ross

2005

Derek McGinn

2006

Derek McGinn

2007

Ricky Fraser

2008

Diane Morrison

 


The Club Trophies

 

The Campbell Cup (1950)

Presented by the late James Campbell, first President of the Club.  Mr.  Campbell played a large part in the founding of the club.  A gifted photographer, he specialised in monochrome prints of interiors and exteriors of buildings.  He was a member of the Scottish Salon.

 

 

The Ernest J Cooke Memorial Trophy (1993)

Established by the Club in memory of the late Ernie Cooke, who died in 1992.  Ernie was one of the most talented photographers to have been a member of the Club.  A skilled and meticulous worker in both monochrome and colour, prints and transparencies alike, and his superb colour landscape prints were works of art.

 

 

The Elena Mae Trophy (1981)

Elena Mae was the name of a chain of photographic retailers with at one time two branches in Inverness.  Ian Rhind, now a successful independent photographer, and an Honorary Life Member of our Club, was for some time manager of Elena Mae and the company presented the cup to the Club for competition.

 

The Major Dick Fleming Cup (1963)

The late Dick Fleming was President of the Club on three occasions, and presented
the cup in 1963, for Intermediate monochrome prints.  By coincidence the cup was
first awarded for a portrait of Dick!!

 

The John Harvey Shield (1978)

John Harvey was an enthusiastic member of the Club who sadly died at a very early age in 1975.  At the same time of his death John was President of the Club and of the Scottish Photographic Federation.  The Club members subscribed for the Cup in his memory.

 

The Highland Shield (1972)

Established by the Club to recognise the period when it occupied the attics of the Highland Club in High Street as clubrooms.

 

Macdonald Cup (1979)

Established by the Club in recognition of Mrs MacDonald who offered the mission hall on Stephens Brae to the Club for clubrooms on very generous terms.

 

Roger Macleod Quaich (1996)

Donated to the Club by the executors of the late Roger MacLeod, a past President of the Club.  Roger was a very enthusiastic member of the Club with great skills as a photographer both in monochrome and transparencies.  During World War 2, Roger served in the RAF as an aerial photographer.

 

The Nairn Cup (1952)

Presented to the Club by the late James Nairn, a keen supporter of the Club in its early days, Manager of the Playhouse Cinema, and a founder of the family firm of Nairn’s Photo-Cine, Mr Nairn had an artistic and inventive nature, and was a craftsman both in cine photography.  During WW2 he invented a link trainer for trainee rear gunners, which was widely used by the RAF.

 

The Ness Cup (1978)

Instituted by the Club in 1977/78 in recognition of the fact that home-processing and affordable commercial processing of colour prints had become widespread.

 

The Stephens Brae Trophy (2008)

Following the sale of the Stephen’s Brae Clubrooms in 2007, the Club established this trophy to mark nearly twenty years there, and to strengthen its dedication to monochrome photography.

 

The June Trevail Trophy (2003)

Donated by members of June Trevail, an enthusiastic and talented member of the Club, who served it in many capacities, latterly notwithstanding a lengthy and debilitating terminal illness.

 

 

The George Morton Tyrell Cup (1956)

Presented to the Club by the widow of Mr. Tyrell, who operated the photography business of D. Whyte’s studio in Church Street.  Mr. Tyrell employed Mr.  Fred Hardley and subsequently sold the business to him.  Fred Hardley who was instrumental in the foundation of the Inverness Camera Club.  The negatives dating from the early years of D.  Whyte’s Studio now form an important part of the Highland Photographic Archive.

 

The Highland Inter-Club Challenge Shield (1999)

In 1999 the Firm of Wardrops Ltd donated a Shield for annual competition amongst the Camera Clubs in the North of Scotland.

 

The eligible clubs annually submit entries which are then judged by an independent judge from out with the area.  Various clubs have hosted the judging event, which has developed into a very popular and successful social gathering as well as a showcase for the work of the competing clubs.

 

 

With acknowledgement and grateful thanks to Ross Martin
f
or compiling and editing this booklet,
and to Mark L
ogan for its production.